Free shipping with orders from $75 | FREE Gift from $150

FREE 100g Lion’s Mane with orders from $150 - All April

Finding Joy, Authenticity, and Renewed Purpose with Jinti Fell (EP#206)

In today’s episode, Mason is joined by SuperFeast's longtime friend and ally, Jinti Fell, for a heartfelt and candid conversation about her journey into the world of online content creation. Together, they explore the ups and downs, the challenges, and the transformative moments that shaped her path. Jinti's story offers valuable insights into the complexities of online identity and the pursuit of authenticity in the online space. 

Click The Links Below To Listen Now 

 

 

 

 


In today’s episode, Mason is joined by SuperFeast's longtime friend and ally, Jinti Fell, for a heartfelt and candid conversation about her journey as entrepreneur, online personality and content creator. Together, they explore the ups and downs, the challenges, and the transformative moments that shaped her path. Jinti's story offers valuable insights into the complexities of online identity and the pursuit of authenticity in the online space. 


Jinti takes us back to 2016, when she first entered the world of online content creation, a time when YouTube was still evolving, and the idea of creating content professionally wasn't widely accepted. Jinti shares her initial motivation, which was to find a creative outlet while navigating the experience of motherhood. Little did she know that this venture would lead her down a remarkable and life altering path.

As her online presence grew, Jinti felt the pressure of meeting external expectations, openly sharing her tendencies as a high achiever and people-pleaser, traits which led her to constantly seek validation through success and approval. In the process, Jinti admits to losing touch with her authentic self, consumed by the opinions of her online community. 

Despite the complexities of her life as a public figure, Jinti emphasises the simplicity of her ultimate goal—to lead a happy, un-compromised life. Her journey serving as a reminder that staying true to your values and seeking joy can stand as powerful guiding forces when navigating life's twists and turns.

A down to earth and relatable chat today. 

 

Image of green water with ripples.

 

"I think my big struggle was just having so many people's opinions, comments and things like that coming at me and me not feeling like I had that foundational strength in me to stay strong and true to myself. I just became at the effect of other people. That wasn't just criticisms, because they could hurt sometimes, but compliments and people just fluffing you up and putting you on a pedestal that really weighed on me too, because I felt, oh, I've got this pressure to be someone or uphold ... Other people think they know who you are and what you're like, and I suppose you want to uphold something. I don't know, there was a lot of me being more committed to being liked and being pleasing, that I felt like I watered myself down so much. I was tiptoeing around things. I didn't want to offend anyone. I didn't want to upset anyone that I just felt like a diluted version of myself."
- Jinti Fell


Jinti & Mason discuss:

  • Jinti's journey into entrepreneurship and online content creation. 
  • Ego death, authenticity and the complexities of online identity.
  • External expectations and the importance of staying true to your personal values.
  • Creating a life in alignment with your personal why and using joy as a guiding force.
  • The herbs and supplements Jinti uses to keep well.

Who is Jinti Fell?

Jinti Fell is an Aussie mother of 3. Jinti is passionate about all things pregnancy, natural/undisturbed birth, health, homeschooling, leading by example, and creating a beautiful life for her family. Jinti thrives through exploring alternate ways to live. She believes that detaching from 'things' and stepping away from conventional living is what truly makes us happy. Slowing down and living with intention is what she hopes to convey through everything she does.

Resource Guide

Guest Links
Jinti's Instagram
Jinti's TikTok
Jinti's Website
Jinti's Youtube

Mentioned In This Episode
Why The Weak Are Crumbling Right Now with Jost Sauer (EP#143)
SuperFeast JING Blend
SuperFeast Eucommia Bark
SuperFeast Deer Antler
SuperFeast SHEN Blend
SuperFeast QI Blend
Shilajit

Related Podcasts
Motherhood, Birth, and Embodying Your Truth with Jinti Fell (EP#129)

Connect With Us
SuperFeast Instagram
SuperFeast Facebook
SuperFeast TikTok


Check Out The Transcript Below:

 

Mason Taylor:

Jinti , thanks for coming in.

Jinti Fell:

Oh, thanks for having me. Thanks for giving me a tour.

Mason Taylor:

Pleasure. In the Flesh.

Jinti Fell:

Yes, for the first time.

Mason Taylor:

Yay. In the Flesh Pod, yeah, for the first time. I was kind of speculating before when we were talking about it, but seven years. I'm kind of just trying to figure out the first time, when I was running SuperFeast's Instagram and we started chatting.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. I remember seeing you online and you were wearing the same singlet back then, and I remember reading some of your blog posts about ... I swear you had a blog and you updated it and I was really interested in it. Yeah. I remember that's how I found you guys and I was reading a lot on there and you talked about your mom. I don't know why that stands out to me.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. Well, that's a long time ago when I was talking about mum on the blog, because I did write on the blog quite a lot right back in the day.

Jinti Fell:

Yes. That's when I started learning from you, I suppose, and getting to the mushies.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. The mum story we're kind of on a bit of a full ... Mum obviously was the reason the whole SuperFeast got started. She just came in and got a full tour for the first time yesterday, because she's moved up four months ago to Byron.

Jinti Fell:

Yes, I saw she was moving. Wow. So she'd never been here.

Mason Taylor:

She'd been downstairs, but four years ago when we just moved in so it was very unimpressive.

Jinti Fell:

Was she impressed?

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. Well, she's always impressed, but she's more impressed about ... She always wants to know about the process that's going on because I feel like she's so karmically tied to the core essence and purpose for when we sat down on her dining room table and decided to incorporate. She was in and she's like, "Why are you going to do this?" I was like, "I just want to demolish the amount of degenerative disease in the world and really help. I don't want it to be about symptoms." I would say this to her, "I don't want it to be about symptoms, I want people to really think about where they want to be when they're 90 years old." You refine that, and that's still the same kind of purpose statement that we have in SuperFeast today, but that's the spirit of SuperFeast. That's the best we can describe the heart.

 

Whether she likes it or not, likewise for me, you have no choice, that's your responsibility. When she comes in, she wants to know and get her finger on the pulse of what's happening and what the pulses of the process is. She came in yesterday and she met a couple of the new people that I've got in here at the moment and just looked at them, without knowing what they did, and was just the people and key people who I brought in recently. She can't talk. She's got aphasia. She's like, "Yes."

Jinti Fell:

That would be nice to be on the receiving end of that. Oh, thank you. I'm meant to be here. Yeah. Also, I think as well, just you saying wanting to understand the process, but just actually being here in person, I just did that small tour, it's really impressive. To see it in person, see all your products and just how you've set everything up, just something that you don't see that when you're buying the product off a shelf or anything. To see the behind, it's very impressive. I'm sure she's just amazed at actually what you guys have created and what it's turned into, especially from being at her kitchen table. It's actually mind-boggling. It's very inspiring. A lot of work, I'm guessing.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah, a lot of work. What I'd love to chat to you about, whether it's a product or whether it's just offering your face and your education or your lifestyle or your family for inspiration, because regardless, same with SuperFeast, although I can now separate myself from the product and people can interact with the product without knowing that it's me that's there it wasn't like that for a long time. I've had a pretty big time when I was doing health education and I was on social media where I got really swept up and lost in the identity of being a health educator, so on and so forth, having people come to me, the expectations when people come to me, people wanting me to solve all of their problems and all that kind of stuff. I backed away into my product business.

 

I'm curious of your process. I'm not going to just jump straight into that specific, I imagine you've had lots of your own real nuanced times with that, but from where it started, because likewise with me and my mom, starting in her kitchen, dining room table, where were you at when you were like, "Oh, yeah. Maybe I'll share some shit."

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. I was pretty much there thinking maybe I'll share some shit and no one will ever see it and it'll just be a bit of a creative outlet. I had not long become a mum. Actually before that I've always loved sharing in different ways, I suppose, even creatively, just making things and sharing things. Then as a new mum, just feeling like I needed something to channel some creative energy into or just something outside of parenting. I remember going on YouTube because I used to listen to music through YouTube and somehow stumbling on some videos where people were sort of sharing their lives and vlogging, I suppose. I'd never seen that before, just thinking, what the heck? I reckon I could do this.

Mason Taylor:

What year do you reckon this was?

Jinti Fell:

Is in 2016. Yeah, the year I'd given birth. It was pretty established then though, but I don't know, maybe I just ...

Mason Taylor:

It really was established, but I mean, I guess keeping it relative to eight years later.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah.

Jinti Fell:

Different landscape, I suppose.

Mason Taylor:

It wasn't really widely accepted that YouTubeing was something that you could do professionally or that it would lead to anything that would sustain you and your family.

Jinti Fell:

Totally. Yeah, no. I suppose I never was thinking of it like that, but I was, in a way, I was thinking, well, if this could create some sort of way we could share and do something that I'm really enjoying and create some sort of income, this would be amazing. Because at the time, Chris, my partner, was in his fourth year studying naturopathy and hating it.

Mason Taylor:

We've got to go back to that because anyone hating naturopathy, I want to talk about. Look, don't get me wrong so many of my friends are naturopaths and I love them to death, but when I hear people hating the institution of education around anything, I want to talk about it.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Well, now, or do you want to just ...

Mason Taylor:

Sorry. Sorry, I don't want to cut off the flow.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. It was a surprise to us to become parents. We'd been together five years, never spoke about having kids. It was just a different stage of our lives. Then we were sort of thrust into this parenthood and being really torn between what should we do? What are we meant to do? What's the pathway to having a successful life and feeling like, oh, we have to be responsible adults now we have a child. Then for some reason that big part of us that had been through this education system being like, no, we have to get our degrees and start our careers that was quite strong in us.

Mason Taylor:

If you don't mind me asking, how old were you in 2016 or roughly?

Jinti Fell:

In 2000 and when?

Mason Taylor:

At that point.

Jinti Fell:

Around this stage when Chris was finishing his degree, it was 2016. I would've been 25. Chris would've been 28 or 29. He started uni a bit later. He tried a few different things. He ended up doing some FIFO work for a couple of years, we travelled, and then he was like, okay, yep getting into naturopathy mostly because he was like, I want to figure out what's wrong with me in a way. He had a lot of anxiety that was just on the increase a lot and really was controlling his life. I think it led him down this path. Also, some travels to India, got him on this path. Anyway, so we were thinking like, oh, we're sort of stuck here having to do these things. This is just how it has to be we're parents now. Then, I suppose this online world started becoming into my sphere and feeling like, oh, this could be fun. This could be an option for us to sort of explore more.

 

It sort of just started there as something fun, something lighthearted. I was at home with my daughter, day in, day out. Chris was working and studying. It was very lighthearted. It was also very, let's just see where this goes. Then along the way, as it grew, as we sort of started working full time online and all different things, there's been lots of ups and downs for sure. I felt there was stages where I had completely lost myself entirely. I didn't have a voice. I honestly didn't even know, feel like, who am I anymore? I really relate to you when you're saying you feel like, how do I navigate this online world, my real life world and the expectations that you feel are placed on you.

Mason Taylor:

Not that I don't want to play like a Dr. Phil or anything, but are you happy to jump into that? Because I am fascinated by that.

Jinti Fell:

Yes.

Mason Taylor:

Just because I'm very aware my experience was unique in the same way that there's probably a similar map to what got me in there in terms of what I was looking for, that you can create a universal map that I'm not that special in terms of the fact that I lost myself. But, regardless, I love hearing the intricacies of what it was like during that and what led to it, what blindsided you and what kind of things you heard yourself saying that you were like, "Hang on, that's not me."

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. No, I love this because this is the sort of stuff that I find the most interesting. If someone wants to ask or talk about something, I'm like, "Oh yeah, let's talk about this sort of stuff," but it's not the questions that people ask.

Mason Taylor:

They're like, "So why did you get back into it? What got you off YouTube to begin with? Are you to get back into van life? How's Chris….been a dad. Does Chris like being a dad?" I read your comments, don't worry. I look at your Instagram stories and watch what the questions have been asked.

Jinti Fell:

You're like, "All right. Let's talk about your mental breakdown."

Mason Taylor:

But I know it's not a breakdown because I know it's a beautiful, magical, alchemical process. That's got lots of nuance.

Jinti Fell:

Well, yeah, it really does. I actually came out of it. I feel like it was this whole ego death, almost, like a death of this identity or this whole persona that I had created that I actually thought, this is who I am.

Mason Taylor:

Who? What was it? Who was it? Who was she?

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Yeah. She was this absolute, massive people pleaser that I can really just see how it unfolded with, I was always striving. I was definitely a huge high achiever in school. I was always just results driven, had to be the best. Because that's how I received appreciation and stuff like that. I was really good athletics and academically, so I was like, "Oh, this is how I prove my worth by always achieving and going after things." Then in the online space, that was always wanting to continue to grow and get subscribers. It's weird to say that because that wasn't this driving force, but it did become this aspect and those sorts of things really sucked up my creativity and actually took away from the very reason I wanted to start in the first place, but I was giving it a lot of energy.

 

Anyway, I think my big struggle was just having so many people's opinions, comments and things like that coming at me and me not feeling like I had that foundational strength in me to stay strong and true to myself. I just became at the effect of other people. That wasn't just criticisms, because they could hurt sometimes, but compliments and people just fluffing you up and putting you on a pedestal that really weighed on me too, because I felt, oh, I've got this pressure to be someone or uphold ... Other people think they know who you are and what you're like, and I suppose you want to uphold something. I don't know, there was a lot of me being more committed to being liked and being pleasing, that I felt like I watered myself down so much. I was tiptoeing around things. I didn't want to offend anyone. I didn't want to upset anyone that I just felt like a diluted version of myself.

Mason Taylor:

I'm going to go twofold. Are there any areas when you were in that space, because you were considered a mentor and you are considered a mentor, but it's a very different context and a very different audience at that time. Because I know when I was there, I can imagine it was like, maybe I shouldn't say it, but more low hanging fruit in terms of the people that we were able to attract were, in that stages of our lives, maybe easier to impress considering that we're not completely integrated in the fact that you were playing out a persona based on some shit rather than going through an internal process of integration that you were playing it out on an external playing field.

 

There's a couple of things I want to talk about here is how fucking fortunate are you that that process that you went through led to you having a platform that you can actually redeem and keep on going with. The first personal development course I ever did, a gold medalist got up on stage doing a big share. It was one of those big three day blah, blah, blah. It's a gold medalist. I won the gold medal. Then I was on the podium and I needed more and I wasn't happy. I sat there going, "Well shit, all my shit has just left me with a pile of shit." I don't have no gold medal. At least you got a gold medal to your name. Little did I know, I hadn't even started my piece of shit yet, which is now a piece of gold, which is SuperFeast.

 

My venturing into health education had a lot to do with me saving the world and saving against tyranny and rejection of institutions. You've gone into your journey there with ... There's a seam of gold, silver linings with the seam of gold there, which you had, which you're retaining, otherwise you wouldn't have able to maintain the trajectory that you're on and maintain that community. When you were in the middle of that process, are there some things that you are in particular, not embarrassed about, but you were on the edge of going, oh, shit, that was where I was like, I'm really aware when you'd get those kind of trigger points in yourself of that's enough.

Jinti Fell:

What do you mean by that?

Mason Taylor:

This is where I tried talk to you before the podcast, we're going to get into some messy points because I don't actually know what I'm asking.

Jinti Fell:

No, but you did say something about are there things ... I think what you meant was when I was sharing online and things like that and putting out this, or acting from a persona, which at the time I was completely unconscious of.

Mason Taylor:

Oh, yeah. Well, definitely intended.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. It keeps him safe and going, but did I sort of almost promote something or go into areas that now I look back at and sort of cringe? Is that what you mean?

Mason Taylor:

Yes. But I just want to hear around that. I don't exactly know what I'm asking. Were there kind of areas where you were like, oh, shit that could have gone really bad, or oh my God, I really went into ...

Jinti Fell:

Down a path.

Mason Taylor:

I went down a path that I'm not proud of. Oh my God, it didn't rupture and destroy me, and I couldn't be more grateful that it didn't, even though I ... Imagine 20 years ago, you go down those paths and a couple of your mates hear about it, or people in a conference hear about it, not the entire world and the internet and the Daily Mail and all that kind of stuff.

Jinti Fell:

No, I don't have that at all. I think there's this level that I've always trusted my intuition, even in different phases. There's always a point for me that I'm like, no, I'm going to listen. Yeah, I've dabbled in things that I look back and I'm like, oh gosh, or I've said something, but I don't feel too cringe about it or ... Well, that's not true. I recorded a podcast yesterday and I definitely woke up this morning being like, oh gosh, what did I say in that?

Mason Taylor:

It's okay being cringe about yesterday so long as you're not cringe about 10 years ago.

Jinti Fell:

To say one thing would probably be anything that I over the top identified with to the point where it's almost ... I used and clung around a label as like, oh, this is who I am. They're the times that I can look back on, say veganism or something like that, where I'm like ... I can be like, oh, I had tunnel vision.

Mason Taylor:

I think I know what I'm asking now.

Jinti Fell:

Okay. Okay, cool.

Mason Taylor:

Thank you, because you just really helped clarify it. Thank you for being really clear in my confusion.

Jinti Fell:

No, hit me with it.

Mason Taylor:

I'm leading this interview. I think before we got on, I told you as well, not that this is anything that anyone needs, but when Tahnee and I deal with a lot of people that have a lot of followers, a lot of people that have a lot of followers, and it was literally last night when I was like, "Oh, I've got Jinti tomorrow." We were chatting about you and we were just both like we really like you and we both liked you on your online. I think you tow this line of tension and tensegrity. I watch it when you're answering questions where you are like, I'm going to give you enough, but then I'm going to go and consider that to myself.

 

I imagine that's a quality that you had before you ventured into this line, maybe that's something that's innate within you that's helped you navigate this space because not everyone goes into the space of getting a persona and getting a community and comes out the backend once they've learned their lessons and becomes integrated and becomes a mother or a father, or getting a family and can keep that thread of continuity. A lot of people, it just shuts off. I feel like I'm not wanting to know the regrets necessarily, even though that was a good ...

Jinti Fell:

Good to know.

Mason Taylor:

What do you see as the quality that allowed you to be self-reflective and tow that line so that there is a continuity of you on this journey? Journey, fuck?...I'm sorry, I said the word journey, but whatever.

Jinti Fell:

I think I said journey earlier. Yeah. I would say that it's allowed me to be clear in my own values, I suppose.

Mason Taylor:

What were the values though?

Jinti Fell:

To begin with?

Mason Taylor:

What navigated you? Because it was completely unconscious as far as I can ... Something innate helped you get through this space. Do you realise how unique it is?

Jinti Fell:

No, I think I'm definitely not seeing it. It's nice to hear you say that. I'm like, "I wonder how that shows up or how ..." It's not something I've probably considered, and it's that thing as well. I don't get into astrology and stuff like that very much, but I actually had my human design read. I don't know if you've heard about human design.

Mason Taylor:

What are you?

Jinti Fell:

I'm a generator. I've got a family of generators. Chris is a manifesting generator, but all my kids are also generators.

Mason Taylor:

Tani's a manifesting generator.

Jinti Fell:

Yes. In my human design, I was sort of told that a purpose of mine here is to always be on the cutting edge, lead by example and experiment. I can fail and fail and fail, but just try new things. Then once I've tried it and then other people feel like, oh, I could give that a go too, but just to always be sort of experimenting. I've always been drawn to alternate ways to live and just ...

Mason Taylor:

Sorry, everyone.

Jinti Fell:

Just sort of go through life just, I don't know, trying new things or just doing what feels good. Maybe that plays into it as well, because I've just got to lead by example or something.

Mason Taylor:

Do you find yourself thinking about your own process more, or the community or the viewers' process more?

Jinti Fell:

Well, I don't really think about any of it much.

Mason Taylor:

I think we're circling something. What do you think about? Why do you do it?

Jinti Fell:

Why do I share online?

Mason Taylor:

Yeah.

Jinti Fell:

Okay.

Mason Taylor:

It's not about online, because this is obviously your art or whatever, your muse or process.It's not about the online platforms.

Jinti Fell:

Well, I find it really fun and energising, which is funny. I didn't realise this was even a thing because Chris would be like, "You're going to go and record a podcast?" He's like, oh gosh, he'd have to be ... I'm like, "Yeah. See ya. Let's go." I don't know. It energises me, it's fun, but it also ... I suppose there's a part of me that I just sharing and maybe I love receiving shares as well. I love stories. I love just hearing about people's lives and I find it very inspiring. To be honest, sharing about my own, it inspires me as well. It's definitely energising. I don't know.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. I hear you. I feel I'm getting a real sense, because in terms of values is a word that gets thrown around a lot, whether it's personally or in business. Personally, it's why I like Taoism in the sense I use the word virtues in my business because virtues arise out of the conditions being right, rather than values seem like something that you need to aspire to.

Jinti Fell:

Yes. I love that.

Mason Taylor:

It's nice, right?

Jinti Fell:

Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

Of course what I value arises. I can't try and have fun and have fun. When you said the word fun, I was like, I'm interested in that because fun's got a lot of nuance in terms of what that means. I can see that when you said that, I'm like, well, there we fucking are. You mean that. When it stopped being fun or when you felt the conditions weren't leading to that expression of something being fun or expressive or that there was no connection or something like that, that navigated you, or helped navigate you in terms of decisions you were making.

Jinti Fell:

A hundred percent. Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

Not to put words in your mouth, but yeah. I'm so glad you said a hundred percent, because otherwise I didn't want to assume that.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. We did YouTube, I know you're not even specifically talking about online anymore.

Mason Taylor:

It's a good example though.

Jinti Fell:

We did YouTube for, I don't even know how many years. It grew into this thing. Around the time when I said I had this, I don't know what it was, it was like an awakening, but it involved a big death. Chris looks back at the time, it's like, oh, the noose of time. This is five years ago now when this happened. We are still like, oh, everything changed after that. It was around that time when I realised what I was doing. I I like to be challenged, but this was just so hard because I was like, why am I doing this now? I've lost my focus on the point of all of this, and it's not fun anymore. I'm not having fun. If I'm not having fun, I'm like, well, what are we here for, in a way.

Mason Taylor:

What you could have said is, you're here, you've got a family and you've got a future to worry about, and it's a monetary stream and all that kind of stuff.

Jinti Fell:

Yes. Yes.

Mason Taylor:

That's easy to say.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Yeah. I suppose maybe that's the thing though. Those things aren't enough for me to want to keep ... I just feel like there has to be a way to not always be creating, but to create a life that can feel good through all of the different seasons. I mean, it's not always going to be sunshines, rainbows and whatever, but I just feel like we don't have to head down a path that we don't have to. We can always sort of reassess and stuff. I think I've got a bit off track here. You're like, "I'm the king of getting off track."

Mason Taylor:

Not even that, I didn't even provide a track.

Jinti Fell:

You provided the journey.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. I hear you. I like it because this is messy. Look, honestly, I'm at the point I can't stand doing podcasts that have anything rote or anything. I don't mind talking about things that have been talked about before, but I like at least them being on the edge of chaos, internally, with whoever I'm chatting to in the sense that there's possibly something new that I can capitulate and express.

Jinti Fell:

I love it. Yeah. I feel like I'm slightly on the edge of chaos, internally, but it's refreshing. It's nice.

Mason Taylor:

Because it's not about YouTube, it's not about anything like that. What I even find myself thinking during that is like, okay, I know how many examples of people I know who have just dropped it fully and gone in another direction. Sometimes I think that's healthy for some people and other times I don't think it's healthy. I kind of feel like that's what I've also done. I had a full mailing list. I could have potentially still been health educating, so on and so forth, and I've dropped it. This is the next thing in terms of sometimes you can get, not resentful towards it necessarily, some people do, but be like, that's gone now. That's in the past. That was such a beautiful time, I'm going to leave that resource there and then I'm going to allow it to lay dormant for a while while I go and figure something else out. Then I'm going to just go and reengage and see…

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. See what's happening.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. I imagine you had something of an experience like that where you've had ... Or you've to leave an entire YouTube channel there, that's one. You've gone through a few reimaginings. How do you not cut and run and just go and run to a new identity versus go through your own transmutation, take it into your family, make it about you, make it about your family, and then go and step out and share that?

Jinti Fell:

I was about to say the lamest thing ever.

Mason Taylor:

Lame is good.

Jinti Fell:

At the end of the day, I just want to be a relatively happy and good person and enjoy my life. So if I'm creating something for other people just to witness that's not even real in me, then what the heck is the point of that? I genuinely just want to enjoy life.

Mason Taylor:

Oh, I hear you. You live and have lived a weird life. You're an anomaly in the sense that you've been in the public eye. I think it's funny and weird and I think, but the simplicity is exactly what it is. It should be. That's exactly what I think it should be for everyone in terms of you come back and be like, look, it's pretty simple, mate. I just wanted to not be compromised. Okay. Now you've got a van again. I don't know. I haven't watched your story, so maybe I'm going ... I want to speed up if that's all right now. You've got a van again.

Jinti Fell:

Yes.

Mason Taylor:

People must be wetting themselves excited that you have a van again.

Jinti Fell:

That's such a funny sentence.

Mason Taylor:

People have been waiting for so long for you to get back into having a van.

Jinti Fell:

I do not know about that. No, I think more than anything people would love ... Or what I hear from people that follow me or whatever online, share some videos again, when are you going to share some videos. It's actually nice. I've had a lot of people over the years just see our family just living, doing basic things, cooking together or just cruising around outdoors and were like, "Wow, that is the first ..." That's an example to me of just seeing a normal, healthy family that they didn't have or something like that. People love watching for reasons that I never considered at the start.

Mason Taylor:

How do you deal with that? There's that TikTok that went viral. I don't know why I know this, it's just I go onto TikTok now because I want to look at SuperFeast and then I get addicted.

Jinti Fell:

It's the scroll hole on TikTok.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. You didn't just call me a scroll hole, did you? No, I called myself a scroll hole. You pop up and what's the name of your breastfeeding child?

Jinti Fell:

Oh, Tashi. Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

Tashi breastfeeding by a creek.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

I think it's that one.

Jinti Fell:

No, that did go crazy.

Mason Taylor:

It went crazy. I went through the comments. I don't know, we live in a bubble, of course. Sometimes I am curious about, and this is a good thing to touch base on in terms of like, look, let's be humble. Let's look at us in our little bubble. We've got a lot to learn and there's a lot of shit that's going to blow our minds once we learn about it. There's other people who are progressing in way heavier ways than we are, but they're in a separate bubble and they happen to look into ours, and then maybe there happens to be something that's inspirational. I'm just going to put that out there, everyone, so you can just like ... The comments were wild.

Jinti Fell:

See, I wouldn't have a clue. I've never looked at them,

Mason Taylor:

Haven't you? Oh, God. I'm more learned in your audience than you are.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. No, seriously. I have a slight idea that when it gets to a point where so many ... It just starts hitting areas that are way outside your bubble.

Mason Taylor:

I didn't get onto one that was negative.

Jinti Fell:

Oh. None?

Mason Taylor:

No, no, no. Not one. Which is refreshing.

Jinti Fell:

I thought you were going to say you didn't find one good one.

Mason Taylor:

Oh, no, no, no. Sorry. I meant just to be the kind of like, oh my God, I yearn for that. Oh my God, I can't believe that that's a reality. I imagine for you to have, oh my God, you've got this perfect ... The people weren't saying you have this perfect life or any shit like that, but we know what happens on social media when it's just like, oh, you're just perpetuating this, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, which you don't do. It was nice to see that part of it. It was just like, oh my God, that's so cool. I'm not going to put the I wish that was ... That was the sentiment.

Jinti Fell:

That'd be a nice experience to have.

Mason Taylor:

It would be an amazing experience. For me, I'm going, oh yeah, breastfeeding in the creek out in the wild, but living in the city. It's refreshing that you don't know that that's the impact of your videos. I really am just trying to be mindful, everyone, that I'm not trying to seem egoic with sharing some kind of lifestyle that's better or anything. I'm just really tiptoeing here, not for fear of kickback or anything like that, just because I just want to really make that clear. That's also a hell of a cool responsibility and impact that you can have.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. The internet's wild. It's crazy. I've been so inspired by people online. I'm with my kids and my family all the time, friends and whatever, but a huge segment of the inspiration I get is often from other people online. It's pretty cool the potential that we have to just do whatever and it impacts someone else. Yeah. Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

Been there for so long, where are you taking it now? Because you're starting to probably get really into the driver's seat of what the next few years are going to be looking like?

Jinti Fell:

I've been a mum for over seven years now and three kids and just so deep in young kids parenting. We created our whole lifestyle, we're in this season we are with our kids. It's been a very parenting. We ended up with full-time jobs online. We didn't have to go and get jobs to support our lifestyle, we could do it online. Then I suppose what happened over time is for Chris, he felt like he was supporting me in doing that. As a man, he sort of felt a little emasculated at times, I suppose. Just feeling like, where's my purpose? I need to be building. We're sort of now entering this time where he's wanting to be building, wanting to be working. We're like, well, how can we create and build something longer term that isn't based on a personal brand, it's based on a product that we love and can stand by or whatever it is. We're just sort of exploring that now.

Mason Taylor:

Do you have a core why of what, regardless of knowing ... Just so you know, I've been thinking about this quite a bit in terms of regardless of what a product is, once you start flirting with an idea, of course there's going to be ideas fluttering around you, just like the same with children. I think you and Tahnee may have talked about that experience before. People can go back and listen to that podcast. Very different to children, but with businesses or ideas or charities, whatever. Have you got that sense of what that fluttering is to be clues of what the heart is, which in a business sense, you can call the why?

Jinti Fell:

Yes.

Mason Taylor:

Then the way it goes once you formulate that heart of it and the why, then the pericardium comes, which is how we do it. They're the conditions of the kind of contract that you put in. We do it this way, we do it this way. This is what we like, this is what we don't like. Then only from there, the product, the what you do becomes the blood. The blood runs through the heart and the why infuses it, but it needs to get past the how of the pericardium. I'm just curious as to where you're at with that process.

Jinti Fell:

That's actually a really helpful explanation for some of the things we've been going through with that.

Mason Taylor:

Well, for $10,000 a month, I can help you.

Jinti Fell:

Seriously.

 

Jinti Fell:

That's a thing you should probably go explore.

Mason Taylor:

Let's not even joke about that. I'm going to get a whole new identity. There's a hectic entrepreneur. Everyone, who wants to be successful? Yes or yes.

Jinti Fell:

Oh my gosh. I'm just picturing you like Gary V.

Mason Taylor:

Hell, yeah. Kerwin Ray, Mason Taylor, Gary. Yeah. I'm going to Gary V all over all of your faces. Yeah.

Jinti Fell:

It's interesting though because for me, I'm like whatever we do, it has to have this really ... It has to feel so right to us. It has to be in full alignment. Chris is more like, I just want to work. I just want to build and do the ... He wants to do the chunky things. He's like, "I think I'll do it with anything." Then those ideas do come around. I think over time we've realised, no, this actually has to be something that we can fully stand behind and it can't just be anything. Yeah.

 

I suppose we've had those things flutter around. We've had plenty of hurdles, I suppose. The biggest thing, I think where we're at in that process is actually just not even affirming, it sounds wishy-washy, but actually being the people that we need to be in order to create something like that, instead of just being like, oh no, we can just continue living our life and doing whatever and not being disciplined and actually being like, no, we need to clean our act up here, here and here, and face things that we've put off so that we can start actually becoming the people that are going to have a successful business or something like that. That's probably where we're at.

 

I mean, we've got an idea that we're exploring and trying to figure out and stuff like that. Yeah. That's sort of the next season I feel like we're heading into so that we get to be whoever we want to be in life. For me, the experience that I had on YouTube where I felt like I lost myself in a sense, or I really diluted, I didn't have the strength to stay true in my voice, what I wanted to say, what I really believed to say, because there was a lot of financial dependency tied into it.

Mason Taylor:

Far out. That's so hectic, isn't it?

Jinti Fell:

Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

I didn't know that that was the case.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

We don't have to talk about the details, but ...

Jinti Fell:

No, but just because that was how we earned all of our income. Then I started feeling like, "Oh, I've got to sort of be ..."

Mason Taylor:

Appease the sponsors.

Jinti Fell:

Yes. Fully.

Mason Taylor:

Did you ever have sponsors glean on you about things that you were talking about?

Jinti Fell:

No, never.

Mason Taylor:

It just your stuff.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

There were probably genuine concerns as well, but it was majority your stuff, worrying about it, do you reckon ?Or did you think that was, if you started sharing what you really thought you knew that then it would cause ruptures with the sponsors.

Jinti Fell:

Yes. I look back now and think, well, that's actually a really convenient excuse that I had to stay quiet or that was a great excuse. Oh, I can't put things out there that might be offensive or something like that because of this. Whereas really it kept me safe and pleasing and stuff like that. It was probably actually more accurate. Moving forward and sort of learning from whatever we've done in the past is like, no, we need to have a business. I don't want to work for someone else. Essentially if I'm working for a sponsor or we're working for other people and we value and prioritise freedom in our life more than anything, and so I'm like, oh no, we actually need to ... This is what we are going to go through next, I think.

Mason Taylor:

I find having someone like Chris who can respect the heart and then build the bones really quick around it, because that's the nicest thing. Just give me the fucking sentence. Just give me the fucking sentence. If I can feel it, you can move me slightly with it, I'll build the bones around it. It's great having people like that around.

Jinti Fell:

Are you someone that wants to build the ...

Mason Taylor:

I am not. I'm a Peter Pan man that just wants to lose myself in the heart of hearts.

Jinti Fell:

Okay. Cool.

Mason Taylor:

I have experienced just swimming around in the gooey ether of purpose and happened to be charismatic enough to catch a couple of waves and to have ... We talked about through genuine love of what I do, gather a certain amount of trust, and then realised I'm a big boneless body that can't actually navigate through space. I've said on the podcast before, it's like in that episode of Harry Potter where he loses all the bones in his arm and he needs to grow his bones overnight. The nurse is like, "This is going to be a painful night, Mr Potter." That's what I'm going through. I'm growing the bones late, which is fine, because this is my experience. That's what I had to do to tune in and define the heart, hard and fast, and then build the bones in real honour of the heart, hard and fast, is so much nicer. I'm just almost feeling relieved on your ...

Jinti Fell:

Don't do it my way at all, but also that business advice ,10K a month.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. 10K a month. You get half an hour of my time on a Tuesday at 4:30 AM because 4:30 AM is when winners wake up. At the same time, I was 25 when I started the business. You know what it was like when we were 25, just young little raggamuffins.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. I mean, I think you've got to give yourself some credit. You're not just a boneless big body. You've actually created some craziness.

Mason Taylor:

Sometimes you're like, oh, it's Frankenstein. He can't even get his fingers to his toes. His ligaments are screwed, man. Where's your Qi buddy? Where's your chi? I think sometimes people might listen to this podcast and be like, Jesus, what's underneath the hood? It's actually a really healthy business. I'm just a perfectionist.

Jinti Fell:

Okay. Right.

Mason Taylor:

This is probably something like yourself will need to contend with is I'm often two years or 10 years in the future and sometimes I haven't known how to have an implementer by my side who has the capacity to enter into that dimension with me.

Jinti Fell:

So, what, you have a vision? When are you in that vision?

Mason Taylor:

Always. As long as I'm not in fog. I've talked to you about this. I think I've talked about it on the podcast, but in case you don't know it, I think I really ... If you go look at Jost's last podcast, J-O-S-T, we talk about Taoist fog walking, and we go into it in real detail. Essentially when the spleen and the stomach, you've got so much input going into a system, and that's the same as a business where there's so many assumptions and you're not really clear on the sole direction that you're going. A business is its own entity, and like a child, it can decide on where it's going to go, but you genuinely know at least that you want a child to be alive when it's 80. That's the same with a business. You know that's the direction and everything.

 

When that gets muddled with other opinions and other assumptions, and not just within team, but within society, so on and so forth, and the spleen bogs up, you start getting really damp and wet within the soil of the spleen. Then what happens is the vapour starts coming up and you get caught in fog. I know we talked about it, but for everyone else listening, that fog means you can no longer see the vision. Because spleen is where the intellect understands that you are taking steps in accordance with the vision that are actually leading to manifestation within reality, where it's palpable reality that's actually making a palpable difference within objective truth, not just my lofty Peter Pan experience of the vision, which comes from the liver. That's why the Daoists, they'd walk up into the mountains and they'd go fog walking. They'd drop into their vision and then the heart and then their spirit, and they'd learn how to shine their light and stay really connected to the vision and the heart, even though there's fog.

Jinti Fell:

They have clarity within.

Mason Taylor:

Exactly. Practising for when it comes up. Jost would talk about it going like, "Mason, try go to a shopping centre in the tweed, in the suburbs of the tweed, where it's uniform and uninspiring before you go in. Tap into what you actually feel is important to you in life and what you love about life and what's virtuous to you, and try and hold it as you walk through it." I actually never realised he's right. You walk into some of these places, and not to say I don't love those places and respect all the people that created it and so on and so forth, but sometimes it is like a fog. You walk in and you just go into a daze and you just do what you have to do. It actually is the fact that if you try and tap in, you're like, oh my God, I actually can't find it. I actually can't find that inspiration. That happens in business. This is where it comes into business models, my gosh. Sorry, everybody. I kind of feel like I'm hijacking this whole thing.

Jinti Fell:

I'm loving this.

Mason Taylor:

Good. Okay, good…. sucked into all you listening, Jinti likes it so I've got permission. I was talking to a friend recently and we were just really diving into these new business models and the psychology of how you relate to them. Hierarchy was obviously a stage. Then it evolved into flat structures and then what they're talking about now is organisms. Organisms, the way they talk about it is having multiple hierarchies. I've always used the terminology, but I haven't been able to really get to the point where I can really describe actually what I'm feeling. My mate, George, George Kavassilas I don't know if you're George Kavassilas. I'll send you the details. He was like, "Look, it's not an ascension model. We want be descending. We want to be descending as is somewhat the journey in life, we want to come down into integration within ourselves. We're not trying to ascend to appease some God or something like that. We're really coming home to ourselves." That's my belief.

 

If anyone wants to know the direction of spirituality that I hold, that's kind of it. Me and George Kavassilas on podcasts, you can go and listen, that kind of maps it out for you in terms of the closest that I can describe what I feel the universe is and what my journey is. He's like, there's a womb at the baseline of this, and whoever is the prime creator of the organisation or whatever, is the one who's in touch with the womb. But of course the womb comes at the beginning and then you give birth and then it grows from the bottom up. It can never be a hierarchy, because you can't go from the top down. You can only go from the bottom up.

Jinti Fell:

Wow. Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

It just explodes with continuity and natural law and just…

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Even just visually, just as you explain that, it feels, it flows. That feels so natural, like an unfolding almost. Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

You can imagine developing an organisational chart, knowing that here's the primordial womb of the creation. Of course that womb comes from other obligations to earth and lineages and it comes spawning off. It's not just a completely new thing, but it can grow up and go now, great, now we need someone to do this, now we need someone to do that. It's not that I have a problem with hierarchy. I like hierarchy of choices. I don't mind using that terminology, but it just doesn't flow with what's needed. You can't grow top down, that's not how nature grows, is not how we grow.

Jinti Fell:

It feels a bit of power imbalances or something like that in that downwards hierarchy where you're sort of like there's the top and then people underneath and stuff like that, and it feels like disempowering almost, or these people aren't as respected or whatever, which it's not always like that, of course.

Mason Taylor:

But it has that.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, it does. Then flipping it and seeing it like that tree, you almost described. Did you even say tree or did I just picture a tree as you were saying it?

Mason Taylor:

I think I was thinking about tree and you psychically pictured it.

Jinti Fell:

Okay. Well, I was just picturing the roots and the branches. It definitely feels more ...

Mason Taylor:

The respect thing is interesting there. I imagine you're thinking about it, because you're going to need to build a team. I don't know if you and Chris are going into this together or doing anything separate, but when you have the roots or you have the womb of a creation, it's not like as you grow and you create branches and people are accountable for branches, so on and so forth. It's not like they don't have the respect and autonomy within their areas and so on and so forth, but it allows you to really sit around your creation and the heart of your business and also acknowledge that you need to have the respect that you're the primary creator that's taken the time, as you are going through now, to go through that process of figuring out what that muse is, what the heart is, what the why is, describing it, growing the bones, showing the map, contributing the vision, and then building the team around it.

 

Hierarchy, it's hard because at some point then you need to be like, "Respect me from the top," but you can't respect the top of a tree you can only respect the roots.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. That's probably why in so many ways the people at the top can become the villains, because they're resentful or you get into drama and they're villainizing people and then people, in their victimhood at the bottom of the ladder or something. I did almost laugh as you're speaking. I was picturing me going back and being ... I was like, "Okay, we've got the wisdom from Mason." There's the womb, Chris. He's going to be like, "Wait, wait, what is happening."

Mason Taylor:

You just need to go like this, "Chris, I've got the womb. Here's the why statement. It doesn't have to have anything to do with the product, Chris, just so you know this, but this is your navigation. This is your North Star. Everything is about manifesting this into reality." He'll be like, "Cool, I don't give a shit. I'll do it, but give me something to work with." You'll be like, "This is how we do it. This is your boundaries." He'll be like, "Yes." Then what we do, and that's when you land in product and he'll go, "Great. Let me grow the bones around delivering that blood to the entire system because we've got organs and limbs that need some feeding."

Jinti Fell:

That's exactly what Chris will say.

Mason Taylor:

I love people like Chris. I love people like Chris.

Jinti Fell:

No, but honestly, that's very helpful. I actually have a question for you. If we cycle back when I said to you, I feel like you're sort of visionary and you said three to four years in the future or whatever. When you are creating something like SuperFeast or I suppose anything in life, if you are envisioning something, are you playing around with that vision daily? Are you imagining this as if it's already happening? I'm curious about that. Did you envision this for SuperFeast or are you still so far ahead that you're like, "Well, this is just the start," or something like that?

Mason Taylor:

Yeah, man. Far out. I'll give a pretty practical answer to this, and there's lots of metaphysical stuff that is around it. In terms of practicality, my vision is ... I actually find it really funny. I kind of told you about, we're doing a little bit of an alchemical process in SuperFeast at the moment. I'm growing some bones at the moment, and when you grow the bones and you come out of the fog for a little bit, all of a sudden you can feel the objective vision. Then when I do tap back into now what I'm sensing, and of course what I'm sensing now is really, really well refined. I feel what I felt 12 years ago or 13 years ago when I first felt SuperFeast. A lot of the ideas were very pie in the sky back then, but I'm actually amazed in terms of getting into oncology, mushrooms in pharmacies, mushrooms in hospitals. These are things that I would just throw around. A

Jinti Fell:

Frequently?

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. Yeah. I look back at the way I was delivering them without grounding and kind of foe conviction, and I kind of feel a little bit condescending towards my past self, knowing what I know now. I'm also like that naive connection division with that crazy, bloody, raw foodist who was able to actually touch with it and dream, he was right. Now, what he didn't do is when he went and said, talk to people who understood what it took to manifest vision into reality. I'd say I might talk to business people who they might not necessarily agree with the dream, but anyway, I said, what would need to happen if I wanted to see these products in pharmacies or in oncology, or if I wanted to have a Taoist healing centre, eventually, that was also a centre of intersection that represented integration and communication between different healing modalities, but also cultivated sovereignty of healing and people and blah, blah, blah, all that kind of stuff.

 

They would've been like, "Okay, so the first thing you're going to need to do is you're going to need to get better margins, you're going to need to secure at the source. If you don't have a contract, you're going to have to have a really close relationship and at least get some written agreements." I was pretty spaced out, like, "No, just trust and faith. It's all going to work out." Now, not that trust and faith wasn't something that I should have ... I've got trust and faith good. Now when I go and talk to my accountant, I didn't have good accountants. I've since got a really good friend who's an accountant, who's like, "I'm going to just throw in a couple of other pieces that's going to help you navigate the path."

 

Because it didn't happen yesterday and they're like, in five years this is going to happen, you're probably going to need to rebrand in order to have people receive you in a particular way. Or maybe there's some kind of like, it's not sales tactics, but maybe you need to realise that there's maybe some wisdom in presenting something a certain way so you can get past people's bias so they can engage with the spirit of what you're doing. I was just like, "No, I'm so special, and what I'm doing is just so unique." Which it was as everyone's idea is, and I couldn't handle the Yin and the Yang of it. I talk about the Scott F. Fitzgerald quote of, "The sign of true intelligence is to be able to hold two opposing ideas at the same time and still function." If you can hold just how special and unique and how your muse will pave a way for you, and you can work within the reality and year timelines and make ...

Jinti Fell:

The more practical aspects of it, I suppose.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, no. I think you, I probably both, that's not our strong point, the practical part, so it's really cool to hear about your process.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. I mean, as I told you downstairs, I'm like, I wouldn't have done this. I'm glad I did, but if I'd really known there's no way I would've done this. This has been the best experience ever, but it's been a harrowing drag through the mud. Look in the mirror, why don't you like getting judged? Why are you such a people pleaser? Why won't you just draw a boundary? Why won't you give that feedback and be generous to that person, because that person wants that feedback, whether they know it or not, and do it in a compassionate way. There's years and years and years and you get five years on and you're like, why is this shit still not working?

Jinti Fell:

It's me. Damn it.

Mason Taylor:

God damn you, sovereign lifestyle that creates mirrors.

Jinti Fell:

Fully. It does sound like, yeah, having a business is personal development on crack or something. It's sort of parenting, I suppose. SuperFeast is like a child to you probably.

Mason Taylor:

Oh, yeah. It is.

Jinti Fell:

It is?

Mason Taylor:

Oh, no. Not exactly.

Jinti Fell:

I was like, if Ayra or a Leo listen to this one day, they're like, "Excuse me."

Mason Taylor:

There's so many metaphors, there's so many crossovers. I just kind of tell people the metaphor is perfect until it isn't. That's the thing, at some point it's not. It's the same way that people are try and talk about a team of a business like a family, and it's like, yeah, it kind of works until it doesn't. Because it's like why diminish family? You are. We are all here surrounding an enterprise or a purpose or a why or whatever, a charity, a cause, and we're choosing to be here together because we all sense that we have an internal purpose that's going to infuse with the purpose of this thing that we're energising and we're all united like that. Versus a family, you can't choose your family. Or if you choose your family, you need to choose them really ...

 

Let's look at it literally, normally you can't. It's a blood family and there's such different energies. I don't like discrediting what a team is around a business with ... I don't like diminishing family. Likewise, I don't like the diminishing team. Things like that they're harsh lessons, but in terms of SuperFeast being a kid, it is in the sense that if you try and fuck with it, you're really at some point ... If someone tries to with Ayra it's going to take a lot, before I really bear my fangs, I'm going to be diplomatic. The fact that the capacity is there that's where the analogy is really correct. If you really try and threaten this thing, you have no idea what this means to me.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Yeah. Well I suppose you have to have that to even have the drive to be here however many years later, otherwise ... We were talking about that earlier, just things not lasting because they probably might not have had such a huge why that you've got.

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. I honestly feel like that's confusion because people run around not realising that the heart of the business is sitting right there.

Jinti Fell:

I've experienced that in my life a lot. I was just like, "Oh. Well, what's my why actually?" I was just thinking that then. I've been on so many cycles just in my own thoughts, just being almost like, what even is it, and just using what is my why as the thing that takes me away from what it actually is. You go looking for it and all of a sudden you can't find it anywhere, but you have to be it. It's not something you're just going to ...

Mason Taylor:

Personal whys are really funny, aren't they?

Jinti Fell:

They're weird. Okay. They have fully weird.

Mason Taylor:

I mean, personal why is something, again, like Daoism has been really useful for me in that sense because you can see shen as having an internal shen, which is intangible and can only be sensed versus shen that's expressed where you can kind of touch it with personality. When we talk about refining our personality so that fun can be expressed and adventure or whatever it is that can get people close or it gets us closer to experiencing our innate shen or our innate why, but it's still maybe on our deathbed, it just goes like, ah, if you've done the work.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

Oh, there it is. Quickly write my statement so I can personally brand in my next life.

Jinti Fell:

Put it in my bio.

Mason Taylor:

Oh, crap, that was unique to this … they should know. Look, I hope you've had fun. I do appreciate you indulging me and asking questions about SuperFeast. I'm going to completely change gears now unless there's anything ...

Jinti Fell:

No.

Mason Taylor:

You've used a lot of Daoist tonic herbs in your life in postpartum and just through motherhood. I had discussed it. You've got a real nice personal relationship with it. Something that I could never understand, I'm really keen to ... I've heard Tani talk about it a lot, but I'm really keen to hear about how you went with the tonic herbs, whether it was through pregnancy or ...

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Yeah. Oh, like the herbs that I use and stuff like that?

Mason Taylor:

Yeah. Outside of tonic herbs as well.

Jinti Fell:

Oh, okay. So it was such a huge thing. I don't mean to bang on about it, but that time when I went through that experience or whatever I had, I joked about it being a mental breakdown, I awakening, I worked with someone just, it happened so synchronistically where he sort of did an energy thing with me. I'm honestly not really into that sort of stuff, but it so happened. He spoke to me about the importance, and you speak about it a lot, of just building an actual relationship with whatever you're having or taking. I suppose I had not been doing that. I'd sort of just would take something, whether that be a tonic herb or a supplement or something. It was almost just taking it to fix something or sort me out in that way. When I started more respecting and honouring herbs and plants and stuff like that and trying to have more of a relationship with them, that's when I started noticing ...

 

Long-term, not just something like, oh, I'll just take this for a week and see if that helps. That's when I felt like I had so much more just like a foundation of wellness and strength or something in a way that I hadn't experienced before. Yeah. For sure through my pregnancies, in lead up to pregnancies and particularly postpartums, but now just within life and parenting, I feel like they've supported me so much. It's subtle as well. It can't be like, oh, it was exactly this, but there's something like I sense or I don't that I'm like, I know that these are really there for me. I would say Jing for sure, and just building my Jing up again has been amazing. Then you recommended me quite a few different things.

Mason Taylor:

Were you going to say deer antler?

Jinti Fell:

I've had deer antler.

Mason Taylor:

…It was pretty big for you coming off being vegan.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Yeah. Chris and I have both had dear antler phases and that was in my pregnancy, pretty earlier in my pregnancy. I had a really, really good experience with deer antler, but I can never say it, is it ...

Mason Taylor:

Eucommia bark.

Jinti Fell:

Eucommia bark that has been with me through my pregnancies as well and just something I really love. And then more recently and shen.

Mason Taylor:

Oh, cool. …shen.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. I hadn't before and quite recently though, and just really enjoying that.

Mason Taylor:

That's nice. I feel like shen's time hasn't come yet. The shen people aren't ready for …

Jinti Fell:

Mason's mushroom.

Jinti Fell:01:11:10):

That would be a very you move, actually,

Mason Taylor:

You know what, part of me wants to just go to Europe where there's less regulation and just do it. Actually, no, what am I talking about? There's so much label regulation in Europe.

Jinti Fell:

Then I suppose massively postpartums and stuff I was for a very long time the chi blend. That was my go-to for such a long time. Then I take things like Shilajit , I mean if you wanted to talk about anything ...

Mason Taylor:

Are you taking the tar?

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, like the resin.

Mason Taylor:

Cool.

Jinti Fell:

It's really popular now. It's one of those things that I'm like ...

Mason Taylor:

We used to sell Shilajit about 10 years ago.

Jinti Fell:

Really? Yeah. You're before your time.

Mason Taylor:

Then I was selling it like 10 years after in the cliquey crew that they got onto it. When I started medicinal mushrooms, I was like, oh, there's no room in the market for me because I was aware of that little micro crew that we're already doing it.

Jinti Fell:

That's crazy. That's crazy. It's saturated. We're done here.

Mason Taylor:

It's saturated. No room for Shilajit and then all of a sudden we're going to see Shilajit companies, well, we are seeing … go nuts right now.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, crazy.

Mason Taylor:

How good is that herb though?

 

Pitch. Ayurvedic mineral pitch. Pure Jing mineral magic.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. That's been a big support. It's not always, I'll go through phases with that. I mean nothing's always, always, but yeah. Then I suppose just herbal teas. What else? I've not taken it yet, but I actually just brought some, I've never had this before and it's a bit weird, but just beef organs.

Mason Taylor:

You're doing beef organs. Nice. Yeah, I'm aware of the time. I think you and Tani discussed the transition from veganism and just how everyone in the vegan community is really supportive when you do that, aren't they? Sorry,…

Jinti Fell:

No, but I think a huge part of it is if you've made a decision or a change or whatever and you've fully owned the aspects of it in yourself, then I think you do have less backlash because ...

Mason Taylor:

Good distinction.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah.

Mason Taylor:

I'm saying good distinction. That's a really great distinction.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Just, in my experience, if I share something too soon or I am not just so solid in myself in it, then all you see is criticisms and all you see is ... I don't know. So for me, I actually have not had a bad experience or anything like that or much criticism.

Mason Taylor:

You take processes internal. I think that's the thing that I think it's sometimes hard for ... Again, it's not that the be all, end all who me and Tani like and don't like. I'm not saying that determines whether someone's good or integrity or not, but I like how you'll sit on a process and you won't ... Oh God, I'm going to put this back on myself. If I've had similar experiences, I know that if I share too early, I'm being an attention seeker.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, right. Or you want the validation or something there.

Mason Taylor:

Subconscious, best intentions, trying to share my transition, but give me the intention. I really want to commend you again for that capacity, whether you've had to cultivate it or whether it's innate.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, that is interesting. I mean I've done the other as well. I've not been with a decision for long enough or be clear enough ... I've done obviously the other as well.

Mason Taylor:

You've done the ultimate though. You got off veganism and shared it and didn't get backlash. That's a testament. That's a testament to being with it.

Jinti Fell:

No, no, there's backlash. There's backlash. If you get something like said really nasty about you or some sort of criticism, that it holds some sort of truth, it always hurts the most because you're like, "Oh, shit. They're right," or something.

Mason Taylor:

They've got me.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah, they've got me.

Mason Taylor:

They've got me.

Jinti Fell:

Then I think for me, when I know so strongly in myself, then it's just like their criticisms don't get you. They're still there.

Mason Taylor:

I know, exactly. That was me with …and raw food. Anyone who's listening that knows him, when you're online and Pete gets it, you're like, "Damn it." When you're a raw vegan it's easy to be God, but you know.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. One thing as well that I would comment on. I think something that I've noticed maybe when people go through different phases or strongly identified with a particular label and then gone away from it, it's always interesting when ... I in ways promoted veganism and 100% in me was like, this is the way. It's humbling. It's so humbling to realise maybe it was just a time in your life you didn't have the information or things changed or whatever. It is interesting when I notice people then going into the next thing behaving exactly the same way. It's going from say, just using veganism as an example, and then bashing on veganism, but then going into carnivore. Then you're like, "Oh no. No, you've learned nothing. Retreat."

Mason Taylor:

The pendulum swing.

Jinti Fell:

Exactly. For me, that's been such a great lesson. I'm like, "I will never do that."

Mason Taylor:

Were you aware of it before you made the transition or did you become aware of it inside yourself after you moved away from veganism?

Jinti Fell:

Veganism, it highlighted that to me hugely.

Mason Taylor:

When you moved away from veganism, you saw your propensity to swing too far the other way and become anti, or were you aware, externally, that that was something you needed to be aware of?

Jinti Fell:

I witnessed it, I suppose, in others.

Mason Taylor:

Got you.

Jinti Fell:

Then I was like, "Wait, no," but also I actually have experienced plenty of pendulum swings where it sort of needed to find that balance. You've got to go to places. I'm just like, but I'm just going to process that before I get on my high horse and ride.

Mason Taylor:

It's whether your pendulum swing out of the vortex. Then some people never get back into the vortex, they just swing right around it. I've loved chatting to you. I'm aware you've got to get back to your family. When are you starting your vlogs on YouTube again?

Jinti Fell:

Dropping next week. No.

Mason Taylor:

What is next for people to follow on Instagram, TikTok. Is that the best way for people to just follow along? Have you got an email list?

Jinti Fell:

I do have an email.

Mason Taylor:

Hell, yeah, because you're a winner and you're smart.

Jinti Fell:

No, because Chris built me this email list because he's smart.

Mason Taylor:

You still are. You have a husband who's also a winner and is very smart. He's got the bones.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Probably just Instagram for now and we're sort of working on a website and stuff like that for a few things coming, but ...

Mason Taylor:

Go through the links to get to your mailing list?

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. From Instagram, you could.

Mason Taylor:

Hell, yeah. And I do recommend following on TikTok if you're on Tikki Toks.

Jinti Fell:

I'm surprised you're on TikTok.

Mason Taylor:

It had been so long that I was trying to get SuperFeast on and I just couldn't convince my team for so long.

Jinti Fell:

Oh, to get SuperFeast.

Mason Taylor:

Oh yeah. Look, don't get me started.

Jinti Fell:

This is when you're like, "I'm the boss now," you're stepping into ...

Mason Taylor:

At the start of it, I was like, "Hey, I'm the boss. Do it. Anyway, now, Ariel, my sister's now on board and she rolled with TikTok, bless her cotton socks.

Jinti Fell:

TikTok's fun.

Mason Taylor:

I jump on and now the algorithm's got me, it's all hippie or algorithm…

Jinti Fell:

I can't even imagine your algorithm. Listen, I truly couldn't.

Mason Taylor:

Yes, I do see your TikTok. I'm sorry for mentioning you're probably like, "Shut up, Mason. That's my secret little place where no one ..."

Jinti Fell:

No, yeah. No. TikTok's good.

Mason Taylor:

Thanks for coming. Anything else you want to share that's going on?

Jinti Fell:

No, I can't think of anything right now. Yeah. Thank you for having me on it. It's so good to chat. We'll have to actually meet Tani next, in person.

Mason Taylor:

Let's put it out there. I know what it's like. I know when we say these things, but let's genuinely put it out there. It's going to happen at some point in the future. Let's have a fire.

Jinti Fell:

We'll hold the vision.

Mason Taylor:

Let's cook some meat and some vegan street foods on the fire at some point in homage to our ex vegan selves and have some chin-wags that way. Thanks for coming on the pod and having this chat with our SuperFeast crew before then.

Jinti Fell:

Yeah. Thank you for having me.

Mason Taylor:

See you, guys.

 

 

Back to All

Next

Sexuality & Endogenous Psychedelics with Dr Jenny Martin Part 1 (EP#205)

Mason is joined by Dr Jenny Martin to share a thought-provoking conversation around sexuality, the body's ability to manufacture DMT and other endogenous psychedelics, and religion's influence on our relationship to sex, pleasure and wellbeing. 

Read more
SuperFeast Podcast Episode #205 Design Tile.